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Refugees 2019

Location
Salt Lake County
Time Frame
Entire Spring Block (6-7 weeks, 4-5 clinic shifts/family visits per week)
Clinical Experiences
Refugee family visits in Salt Lake
Clinical shifts in Salt Lake (Hope and Maliheh clinics)
Other Experiences
Class once a week in Provo
Outside Trips/Weekend Culture Experiences
Refugee ward church services
Cost
No additional cost (outside of Spring tuition/gas expenses)

Reflections:

"As I reflect on the experiences that I have been blessed with this semester, I feel a great call to action. I specifically wanted to work with a local population for this semester because I felt that although it is an amazing experience to see the world and see how privileged America is, it is important to see those who need help right next door. I do feel that global nursing is an important component in the medical field but I also think that it can be aggrandized, causing the local populations to look less desirable and exciting to interact with. It is important to maintain a healthy balance of awareness about what is going on locally and globally. This directs me to my next point, many people do not even know that Utah has a refugee population which indicates to me a need for further awareness and support. I believe that many individuals would provide service if they were aware of where to channel their abilities."

"On a professional level I am even more motivated to work toward making a difference even if it is in a small way in the lives of refugees and immigrants. This kind of work requires an attitude that is completely different from the attitude one has when working in a hospital. One must maintain a flexible attitude and recognize that problems may not be solved but situations can be improved." 

"This semester has taught me so much about truly learning the Healer’s Art. Everyone on this earth is truly our brother or sister. No matter the circumstances, beliefs, or practices, they are all God’s children. I’m grateful that here at BYU I am learning not just how to be a good nurse, but also how to truly learn the Healer’s art. It requires more than clinical skill. Rather, we must learn the compassion and sympathy towards others. We must cultivate a true desire to help and serve others. And we must be faithful and diligent enough to press forward and help make a difference."


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